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THE CITY REBORN FROM THE ASHES OF AMERICA'S MOST DISASTROUS FOREST FIRE
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Country Cousin

Watch Eclipse With Care!...

Why do the months of June, July and August seem to fly by, while January, February and March take forever? They don't even have as many days! Seems like Summer has barely started, and here it is, time for the Marinette County Fair. Starts Thursday, Aug. 24, and runs through Sunday, Aug. 27. Then school starts and Summer fun is over for another year!

Of course, Autumn is also beautiful in TIMESland, and we have that to look forward to, as well as the Peshtigo Historical Day celebration on Saturday, Sept. 30. Set that day aside now. There's lots of fun being planned.

CRAFTERS NEEDED

Speaking of Historical Day, Craft Sale Chair Betty Malke says vendors are needed. If you have crafts to show or sell, contact her at 715-938-4018.

SOLAR SAFETY

On Monday, Aug. 21, a total eclipse of the sun will be visible from many parts of the United States for 2 to 3 minute durations at about mid-day in most areas. The closest point for us to experience that once in a lifetime spectacle would be in southern Illinois. Here in TiMESland a partial eclipse will be visible from approximately 11:54 a.m. to 2:36 p.m. on Monday.

That said, no one can directly watch the eclipse, full or partial, without risking serious eye damage, including blindness. To watch it, special viewing glasses are required, or welder goggles and filters in shades 12 and 14. Sunglasses do NOT provide enough protection.

Marinette County libraries have scheduled special eclipse viewing events, and have the special viewing glasses available to watch. They suggest anyone interested should contact their local library branch to find out what it has planned and when it will be happening. The libraries have a supply of the eclipse viewing glasses to distribute to those who participate. Their website says anyone who does not want to stay for the entire two and a half hours of the partial eclipse will be allowed to take their glasses with them when they leave. They warn that the glasses must not be used if the lenses become scratched or damaged. Even when obscured by the moon as it is in a total eclipse, the sun's rays can cause permanent eye damage in a matter of seconds.

Sunglasses will not prevent eye damage. Do NOT look through a camera view finder, and do NOT use binoculars to see the eclipse.

BUILD A VIEWER

You can watch the reflected encroachment of the celestial orbs with no danger to your own orbs, view it indirectly by using a pinhole projector.

For the simplest version, you need two sheets of white cardboard, aluminum foil, tape, and a pin, toothpick or paper clip. Cut a small square hole in the center of one of the pieces of cardboard. Tape the foil to it. In the center of the foil make a pinhole. Lay the second piece of cardboard on the ground and hold the piece with aluminum foil above it, with the foil facing up. However, do not look at the foil. Stand with the sun behind you, shining through the foil pinhole, and look at the image projected on the cardboard on the ground. The greater the distance between the pieces of cardboard, the larger the projected image will be. You might want to practice ahead of time.

For a slightly more sophisticated viewer, you need a long, large cardboard box or tube, scissors, duct tape, aluminum foil, a pin or a thumbtack, a sharp knife or paper cutter, and a sheet of white paper.

Cut a rectangular hole at one end of the box. You can tape 2 boxes together to make a long box. The longer the box, the larger the projected image. Using the scissors, cut out a piece of the aluminum foil slightly larger than the rectangular hole. Make sure the foil is completely flat and not crinkled at all. Tape the foil over the rectangular hole in the box, on the outside of the box. Use the pin to poke a tiny hole in the center of the foil. Tape the sheet of white paper on the inside of the other end of the box. Stand with your back toward the Sun. Hold the box over your head with the pinhole toward the Sun. Adjust your position until you see a small projection, a reversed image, of the eclipsed Sun on the paper inside the box.

You could also tape two tubes together, end to end. On one end of the tubes, tape on a smooth piece of foil and poke a pinhole through it. Over the other end, tape a piece of white paper to act as the screen. Close to this end, cut a rectangular hole, using the knife. This will be your viewing window. With your back toward the Sun, point the end with the foil toward the Sun, angling the tube along the Sun's rays. Do NOT look at the foil. Do NOT look at the Sun through the pinhole. Do look into the tube through the viewing window until you see a reversed image of the eclipsed Sun on the white paper screen.

SOLAR ECLIPSE LEGENDS

Ancient peoples were justifiably terrified when an eclipse happened. Not understanding what had happened, they came up with lots of legends and stories to explain the temporary disappearance of the sun. Legends say they thought the world would come to an end or a great evil would follow. Myths often involved a beast trying to destroy the Sun with the fate of Earth hanging in the balance, or stories of a Sun-god becoming angry, sad, or sick.

Fear led some Chippewa people to shoot flaming arrows into the sky to try to rekindle the Sun. Tribes in Peru did the same, hoping to scare off a beast that was attacking the Sun.

Some North American Indian tribes believed that an eclipse was simply nature's way of "checking in" with the sky, perhaps a sort of house cleaning. The Sun and the Moon temporarily leave their places in the sky to see if things are going all right on our planet Earth.

Native people in Colombia shouted to the heavens, promising to work hard and mend their ways. Some worked their gardens and other projects especially hard during the eclipse to prove it.

In Norse culture, an evil enchanter, Loki, was put into chains by the gods. Loki got revenge by creating wolflike giants, one of which swallowed the Sun, causing an eclipse. They believed another of the giant wolves chased the Moon, trying to eat it.

In India, the demon spirit Rahu steals and consumes the nectar of immortality but is beheaded before he can swallow it. His immortal head flies into the heavens. The Sun and Moon had alerted the gods to his theft, so he takes revenge on them: When Rahu swallows an orb, there is an eclipse, but the orb quickly returns to view because Rahu has no body!

In German mythology, the hot female Sun and cold male Moon were married. The Sun ruled the day, and the sleepy Moon ruled the night. Seeking companionship, the Moon was drawn to his bride and they came together, creating a solar eclipse.

West Africans of Benin switch the gender roles of the Sun and Moon and suggest that the orbs are very busy, but when they do get together, they turn off the light for privacy.

In Tahitian myth, the sun and moon are lovers who join up, providing an eclipse. Because they might get lost in the moment, they created stars to light their return to normalcy.

ON THE SOAP BOX NEW WAR ON DRUGS

There's much in the news recently of the national opioid epidemic. A drug commission convened by President Donald Trump some time ago and headed by Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey found that an average of 142 Americans die every day from drug overdoses. That's equivalent to the death toll of a 9/11 event every three weeks!

And that's only the deaths. It does not count the number of lives ruined, families destroyed, crimes committed, by persons under the control of their addiction to opiate drugs.

(Strange. Recall in 1972 President Richard Nixon declared a federal War on Drugs. Some steps were taken to curtail drug use, but somehow shortly after that, instead of a war on drugs, national energies and major news media attention turned instead to a war against tobacco use. Smoking has slowed down since then, but drug use, particularly opiate drug use, has increased dramatically. Coincidence, or did the drug pushers perhaps have something to do with that? Wonder where drug abuse would be today if society had put that much time and effort into the War on Drugs in the last 45 years?)

In response to the recent drug commission findings, President Trump has stated that opiate drug use is a national emergency, and said he will soon have documents prepared making that an official pronouncement.

Exactly what that means in terms of action against over use of the dangerous and over prescribed opiate drugs is uncertain at this point, but it does mean the problem is at least recognized on a national level. Hopefully steps will be taken to deal with it, not just to treat those with addictions, but to prevent addictions in the first place.

Marinette County for several years has had the dubious "honor" of being one of the places where opiates were most heavily abused. It is a credit to our state and local leaders that our county also has been one of the leaders in bringing out new and improved ammunition in the war against drugs. Those weapons include the TAD program and the highly successful Drug Court, both at least partly funded by state grants.

The epidemic here was blamed in part on a physician in Menominee who was over-prescribing opiate drugs and then advising black market heroin as a substitute when his patients couldn't afford their prescriptions. That former doctor is now in prison, and his license is revoked, but the problem he helped create continues, and many are dead because of it. However, it was never a localized problem. It just happened faster here.

Since the recent commission's findings were released, several members of Congress, among them Sen. Rob Portman, an Ohio Republican, have said Washington "must continue to fully fund important programs on prevention, treatment, and recovery." Several referenced Medicaid payments for stays in drug treatment centers. Treatment, unfortunately, seldom cures an addict. Prevention is the real answer.

Something likely to be more effective over the long term is Portman's call for Congress to pass laws to "help stop overprescribing". and help stop the flow of synthetic opioids that are shipped into this country through the postal service." Efforts to halt illegal border crossings to bring in illegal drugs also will help.

We can all help. If our doctor prescribes an opiate pain killer for us or for a family member, we need to be aware that these types of drugs are highly addictive. Some experts say occasionally a person can become addicted with just one use. Before agreeing to use them, we need to ask ourselves if they are really, really needed. Can we or the person we're responsible for get along without them? Could something else do the job with less risk? If we do allow opiates in our homes, we must be extremely careful not to let them fall into the hands of children or anyone else who would misuse them.

Government alone can do just so much. This is a case where we, as individuals, really can make a difference!

THE REAL McCOY

July 23, 1872 was the birthday of Elijah J. McCoy, a black inventor, raised in Ypsilanti, Mich. McCoy invented and patented the first automatic lubrication system for locomotives and other machinery. According to Michigan Department of Transportation, the device McCoy developed was so effective that it became difficult to sell imitations that weren't "the real McCoy" thus McCoy's name became synonymous with anything genuine or authentic.

Now there is something to be proud of!

STRONG FALLS

The high water levels make this a particularly good year to visit some of Marinette County's beautiful waterfalls. The main waterfall at Goodman Park is named Strong Falls. Not because of the force of its water, which is awesome in any year, but in honor of Civil War Veteran Marcellus V.G. Strong, who lived from 1838 to 1896, and was an adjutant general of volunteers during the war. Strong moved to this area after the war. He lived for some time in Hermansville, Mich., where he served as village marshall. He is buried in the Meyer Township Cemetery at Hermansville.

COOKIN' TIME

Have been using some great recipes recently that came from the marvelous cookbook published by Northern Lights Master Gardener's Association, thanks to the generosity of Robert and Mary Holley. Gail Mandli, one of the individuals responsible for that book, says their goal was to include delicious and unusual recipes unlikely to be found elsewhere, or new twists to old recipes. They have succeeded marvelously. If you want your own copy, contact her at 715-789-2872.

CREAMY TOMATO BASIL SOUP

This makes a great meal with a tuna salad sandwich.

4 large tomatoes, peeled, seeded and diced

4 cups tomato juice

14 leaves of fresh basil

1 cup heavy whipping cream

1/4 cup butter

Salt and pepper to taste

Place tomatoes and juice in stockpot over medium heat. Simmer for 30 minutes. Add basil leaves, and then puree the mixture. Return to stock pot and cook over medium heat. Stir in the cream and butter until the butter is melted. do not boil. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve and enjoy.

PASTA SALAD

Makes a large batch. Perfect for pot lucks, or for a weekend gathering of the clan. Use whatever fresh vegetables your garden or the local farmer's market has to offer, like tomatoes, carrots, cauliflower, broccoli, radishes, cucumber, zucchini, or peppers, whatever is in season. Personally also would add a bit of finely diced onion. This recipe varies in the amounts, depending on the number to be served and what vegetables and herbs are available. Do make it at least a few hours ahead to let the flavors blend before serving. At serving time, add more mayo or Miracle Whip if it seems too dry.

1 package rotini pasta, cooked and well drained

4 cups of raw vegetables, sliced

1 can garbanzo beans, drained

1 can dark kidney beans, drained

1 cup cheese, cubed

3 eggs, hard boiled, sliced

Dressing:

4 heaping tablespoons light Miracle Whip

4 heaping tablespoons vanilla yogurt

2 tablespoons white vinegar

2 tablespoons sugar

1 tablespoon dill weed, snipped

1 teaspoon celery salt

Fresh ground black pepper to taste

2 tablespoons chives, chopped

In a large bowl mix the pasta, vegetables, beans, cheese and boiled eggs. In a separate bowl mix the dressing ingredients, and then stir it into the pasta/vegetable mixture. Cool in the refrigerator until serving time.

Blueberry Banana Zucchini Bread

Delicious and simple bread that is absolutely bursting with flavor and nutrition. Let the kids eat all they want. Don't tell them it's good for them. Makes 12 servings.

1 large egg

1/2 cup light brown sugar , packed

1/3 cup coconut oil, liquid-state

1/4 cup granulated sugar

1/4 cup cup sour cream

1 tablespoon vanilla extract

1 1/2 to 2 cups all-purpose flour* see notes

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, optional

1 cup fresh grated zucchini

2 medium bananas , mashed

1 cup blueberries

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease one 9x5-inch loaf pan. (You can also split the batter into two pans, just be sure to adjust the baking time.) Grate the zucchini and remove moisture by placing between layers of paper towel and pressing firmly. In a large bowl, whisk together the egg, brown sugar, coconut oil, granulated sugar, sour cream and vanilla extract. (If the coconut oil isn't liquid, heat slightly until it is.) Add flour, baking powder, baking soda, and cinnamon, and fold into mixture. The batter should be quite thick. Add more flour if needed to thicken it up. Zucchini and bananas differ in moisture content. Add the zucchini, bananas, and blueberries, and fold gently to combine. Turn batter into the prepared pan, smoothing the top lightly with a spatula. Bake for about 65 to 80 minutes or until the top is golden, the center is set, and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. If the bread starts to get too dark on top before it tests done, lightly place a piece of foil over the top. Once done, allow the bread to cool in pan for 15- 20 minutes and then transfer to a wire rack to finish cooling.

The Country Cousin

Thought for the week: "Always keep your heart open. It's the only way to give and receive love." Good advice from the mother of actress and artist Jane Seymour. Closely related to advice from Jesus as quoted in John 1:4:7: "Beloved, let us love one another, for love is from God; and everyone who loves is born of God and knows God," followed quickly by this at John 1:4:21: "And this commandment we have from Him, that the one who loves God should love his brother also."

(This column is written by Shirley Prudhomme of Crivitz. Views expressed are her own and are in no way intended to be an official statement of the opinions of Peshtigo Times editors and publishers. She may be contacted by phone at 715-291-9002 or by e-mail to shirleyprudhommechickadee@yahoo.com.)


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