space
space
Peshtigo Times
space
space
space
Perspectives
* Ken Stodola's Letter to the Editor
space
space
Sports Shorts
* WIAA's KAGE RETIRES, BRITZ HIRED AS ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
* Cougars Look to Reload to Defend Title
* Menominee Goes 4-0 Over Weekend; Post 39 Drops Contest to Manitowoc
* Coleman's Casper & Bieber Share Baseball MVP
* Coleman's Casper & Bieber Share Baseball MVP

space
Peshtigo Fire
space
e-Edition
Now Available
For more information
click here
dot
THE CITY REBORN FROM THE ASHES OF AMERICA'S MOST DISASTROUS FOREST FIRE
space
dot
space

Country Cousin 6/29/22

Issue Date: July 5, 2022

Shirley Prudhomme

Happy Birthday, America!

As the weekend approaches, most of us here in TIMESLand and all across America are getting ready for some big Fourth of July celebrations.

There will be picnics, parades, fireworks and all sorts of festivities, public and private. The timing couldn't be better, as the Fourth of July - Independence Day - falls on a Monday. We get to start celebrating on Friday, July 1, and won't stop until Monday evening.

Even the weatherman is cooperating. He's promising temperatures in the high 70s and lower 80s, and mostly sunny, until Monday evening, so we won't feel so bad when the weekend ends. then it's back to moderate summer temperatures and partly cloudy skies for the next few days.

We wouldn't dare ask for more!

LOVE THIS LAND!

No matter how much the nay-sayers criticize our wonderful nation, it is a wonderful nation. America's Declaration of Independence from the despotic monarchy that was Great Britain in 1776 started a revolution that pretty much changed the world and brought the opportunity for freedom and prosperity that the common man had not known anywhere before.

There have been glitches along the way, and even in our great land, nothing is perfect. But the beauty is that we're free to try.

That's what we are celebrating on July 4!

GYPSY MOTHS

Is anyone else faced with as Gypsy Moth problem? In less than two weeks they have managed to almost totally strip the leaves from the magnificent old White Oak tree that shelters our home. Or threatens it, depending on which way the wind is blowing. That venerable tree has almost certainly lived where it is for over 100 years, providing shade for the yard and a a home for birds, squirrels, wood ticks, and who knows what else.

It survived the Gypsy moth invasion 20 years ago, but we are terrified that this time those nasty voracious worms will bring it to the end of its life cycle.

If you have any suggestions for getting rid of the gypsy moths and saving this tree and others in our area forests, please let me know. See "Country Cousin" contact information at the end of this column.

The tree is so huge that spraying doesn't seem to be an option, unless we hire an airplane, which property owners in Porterfield area did when their area along Hwy. 180 and elsewhere was infested two decades ago.

These days, the highly educated elite at our most exclusive colleges seem to be more concerned about semantics than they are about saving trees. They have ruled that the Gypsy moths must now be called "Spongy Moths." The term "Gypsy" is an ethnic insult to some Romani people -who in the past were commonly known as gypsies, you now.

Wish these highly paid thinkers would put as much thought and effort into finding ways to protect our trees from the depredations of these nasty, voracious creatures as they did into finding a politically correct name. The Gypsy moth caterpillars - oops"Spongy worms - are said to dine on over 300 species of hardwoods, and have stripped entire forests. Unfortunately, in our area at least, they seem to prefer the mighty oaks that are already under assault from Oak Wilt and other problems.

"Spongy" refers to the moth's fluffy, porous egg masses, which had inspired the species' existing common name in France and French-speaking Canada: "spongieuse." The new name was declared effective immediately. And the caterpillars are still eating.

GROWIN' THINGS

Summer is going by too fast. Sadly, it's about time to quit harvesting asparagus, despite its late start this year. You'll know for certain when noticeably fewer new shoots are popping up. If you want a crop for next year and beyond you must let some spears from each root grow to maturity, and let the ferns grow until they turn brown in fall. As with other perennials, the foliage produces nutrients that keep the root systems alive and well.

If your crop has asparagus beetles and you cannot control them by picking them off, buy some good quality pest killer with the asparagus beetle listed and use according to package directions. Even if organic gardening is important to you, you may have to give in to this chemical control to save the patch. Anyway, the dust and/or spray should be washed away by the time you get to eat it again next spring.

One Extension agriculture site advises cutting down all the foliage from the bed at this time and then cultivating shallowly to get rid of the weeds that will hamper nutrient gathering for the asparagus. It is a good idea to do this every few years. Cut it, cultivate, then mulch between rows and let the ferns grow until they die of natural causes in fall. Once those tops are brown, remove them, so they don"t harbor bugs and diseases for next year.

If you're wanting to expand your asparagus patch, or start a new one by planting roots you should wait until next spring, when that chore should be done as soon as the ground can be worked. But if you want to start a bed from seed, you could try doing it now, even though it is very late in the season.

We have successfully added to our asparagus beds by starting new clumps from seed, but keep in mind that this is a labor of love. You won't be able to harvest any asparagus from the seed-started beds for at least three years unless you want to kill it off. Production may be spotty for another year or two beyond that. But once established the asparagus beds will keep producing for 20 years and more with very little effort.

To get started, cultivate the row to be planted quite deeply, then apply a balanced fertilizer (like 10-10-10) and cultivate again. Then rake over. We"ve done our planting in little patches, each about 18 inches in diameter, and spaced about 18 inches apart in the row, with about the same space between rows.

Remove about 2 inches from soil from each round patch area and sprinkle lightly with seeds. Replace the soil cover, and repeat with the next little patch. A packet of seeds probably won"t do more than two or three of these. Water thoroughly and keep watered. A nice mulch cover is a good idea, especially this late in the season. Repeat: Keep watered!

You can also plant the seeds in rows 2" deep and 18 inches apart. The new seedlings should emerge in about 3 weeks, and as soon as they are large enough they can be thinned out to about two inches apart. Once the seedlings reach about 6 inches high, they can be thinned a bit again, but I wouldn't get carried away and thin out too many.

Keep the plots watered, mulch well come fall, and see how many of the seedlings make it through the winter. Thin again in spring if you need to. Then you can transplant the thinnings to an additional little plot if you like. We just left ours where they were growing and it worked out fine. But repeat: do not harvest this seed-started asparagus for at least three years. Those new roots need to store nutrients and build strengths so they can survive for the coming decades.

By the way, small asparagus clumps are very nice additions to the flower garden. They will eventually produce edible spears, and the ferns make a nice backdrop for other plants and are lovely in cut flower bouquets.

PLUG THE HOLE

Leaks in the garden hose aren't too bad, provided they allow the water to spray where you want it anyway. But most of them don"t. Sometimes they turn the spay toward the holder of the hose, which isn't good at all.

If your hose needs fixing, and if the hole is small enough, a toothpick may do the trick. Break off one third of a toothpick and shove it into the hole until the broken end is flush with the hose"s outside surface, then wrap waterproof tape around the hose to secure it. May not be absolutely permanent, but it should see you through the season.

ON THE SOAP BOX

BRAVE, BRAVE MEN


When we celebrate Independence Day we're celebrating the achievements of a group of brave "subversive" patriots who got together in 1776 to put their lives and fortunes on the line by signing the document we know as the Declaration of Independence.

It"s hard for us today to realize what tremendous heroism was involved in signing that revolutionary document.

The signers were for the most part men of comparative wealth and prominence in the colonies. They were risking not only their own lives, but those of their families. If the American Revolution had failed every one of those signers, if he survived, would have been almost certainly been hunted down and executed. Their families would have been left destitute, since the "Crown" would have seized whatever properties and fortunes they possessed. Chances for enemies of the king to recoup a lost fortune in those days were almost totally nonexistent.

The brave men who signed the Declaration of Independence were willing to give their all for freedom.

They did not insist on "entitlements" for themselves or their friends.

They did not promise health or wealth or happiness to their fellow men - only the right to pursue it.

They did not intend for their new government to take the fruits of any individual"s labors and give them to someone less industrious.

They did not intend to dictate our personal beliefs, in fact they promised freedom of religion. It seems fair to assume that their idea of freedom of religion would include the right to promote our "personal preferences" and condemn practices that some of us today continue to find reprehensible. They intended the right of parents to prevent their children from being taught that some things they bitterly oppose are morally acceptable.

Among those who signed the Declaration of Independence were two future presidents, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. Contrary to popular belief, George Washington was not a member of that group, but given the opportunity he almost surely would have been. Edward Rutledge, 26, was the youngest signer, and Benjamin Franklin, 70, was the oldest.

The far left activists of today are working hard to erase so many of the freedoms our nation's founding fathers fought and died for. They are stifling free speech by forcing our language to become "politically correct." Instead of going through the legal processes our Founding Fathers provided for, They are threatening the Supreme Court for making decisions that do not meet with their approval. They claim everyone should have the right to vote, even non-citizens who do not share the values or understand the language of our country. And above all, they seek to prevent any public exchange of thoughts that differ from their own political preferences.

What a bunch of narrow minded bigots. Appropriate that they're parading about in Donkey garb!

STILL ON THE SOAP BOX

RIGHT TO DISAGREE


Freedom is all about the right to disagree, after all. It is also about the right to protect our families, preserve our own moral standards, and live our lives as we see fit, as long as we do do not interfere with the rights of our neighbors to live as they see fit.

Nowhere in the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution or the Bill of Rights in the brave new nation that these patriots created was there a promise that food, medical care, housing, or other necessities would be provided to anyone. The only promise was freedom - assurance that the new government would put no limits on the individual"s right to take care of those things for themselves.

Why, oh why have we gone so far astray??? Why are we so busy minding our neighbors" business that we're in the process of allowing the best form of government this old world has so far produced to be destroyed???

John Adams said after America was born, "You will never know how much it cost the present generation to preserve your freedom! I hope you will make good use of it!" May we always remember that and hold it as our sacred duty to protect that for which so many risked so much! May we always remember to give thanks to Him who saw to it that these great men came together at the right time on the face of the Earth to form our new nation, and now, let us pray that those of us who follow are alert and aware enough to protect the Tree of Liberty that they planted!

COOKIN" TIME

Enough on the serious side. Birthdays call for celebrating, and that"s what most of us do on our nation"s birthday, our favorite midsummer holiday! Let's enjoy some great food, from hot soup and cold sandwiches to red, white ad blue desserts. We love hot soup and cold sandwiches for lunch on a hot summer day, accompanied by tall cold glasses of lemonade. Lots of folks disagree, but my thinking is it's never too hot to eat soup, just too hot to make it. That"s where slo cookers come in, and why there are canned soups on the supermarket shelves. About those slo cookers: You can plug them in outdoors, provided it"s under a roof or i's a day when you"re absolutely certain there won"t be rain. And then there are cold soups for jaded summer appetites. Pick your favorites and enjoy!

CHILLED BEET BORSCHT

Easy and refreshing. You make it in a blender. Serve with egg salad sandwiches if you like, or maybe chicken salad made with the remains of a purchased rotisserie chicken. Use the skin and bones from that chicken to make a broth for your next batch of soup!

1 can shredded beets

1 can beef broth or bouillon

1 tablespoon sugar

1/4 cup sour cream

1/2 cup lemon juice

4 ice cubes

salt and pepper to taste

1/4 cup sour cream for topping

1 lemon or lime, quartered

4 sprigs dill weed or parsley, finely minced

Blend beets and their juice with the bouillon, sugar, the first quarter cup sour cream, lemon juice and ice until smooth. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve in chilled cups, each topped with a little dollop of the remaining sour cream and lemon or lime quarter, and a sprinkling of minced parsley or dill weed. If you have no blender, drain the beets and save their juice in a mixing bowl with a spout. Puree the beets and add the sour cream, then mix with everything else until the ice cubes melt. Chill until serving time.

EASY ASPARAGUS SOUP

2 cans cream of chicken soup

1 can half and half cream

1 can tender asparagus, cut into half-inch pieces, or

equivalent amount of cooked fresh or frozen asparagus

1 teaspoon minced fresh tarragon or a pinch of dried

crumbled tarragon

Mix everything and simmer three or four minutes to blend flavors. This is good hot or cold.

WISCONSIN BEER BURGERS

2 pounds ground beef

1 cup shredded cheddar cheese

1/2 large onion, finely diced (or garlic salt)

1 clove garlic, finely minced

1/4 pound chopped, crisp cooked bacon

1/2 teaspoon lemon pepper

3 tablespoons beer

4 pats butter, very cold

4 hard rolls or Kaiser rolls

Catsup, mustard and sliced dill pickles to taste

Combine garlic, cheddar cheese, beef, beer and seasonings. In another small bowl combine the bacon, onion and cheese. Shape the ground beef mixture into 8 thin patties. Put bacon/onion/cheese mixture on four of the patties. Top with remaining patties and press edges to seal. Grill, broil or pan fry until well done, about 4 minutes per side. Top each burger with a pat of cold butter (Mickey Lou style) and serve on a nice crusty toasted hard roll. Pass the pickles, catsup and mustard.

RED, WHITE AND BLUEBERRY

CHEESECAKE PARFAITS


Makes four easy and elegant patriotic servings, provided you use really pretty glasses.

1 pint blueberries

1 pint strawberries

3 tablespoons sugar

3 tablespoons currant jelly, melted

8 ounces softened cream cheese

3 tablespoons milk

2 tablespoons lemon juice

2 tablespoons sugar

1 container frozen whipped topping, or real sweetened whipped cream (use 1 cup in the cheese mixture and save the rest for topping)

8 tablespoons graham cracker crumbs

4 large juicy strawberries

Several reserved blueberries

Chop most of the blueberries very coarsely in the food processor, but keep a handful whole. Stir in the currant jelly and set aside. Chop or slice most of the strawberries but keep four nice ones whole. Stir in the sugar. Set aside. In a mixer bowl beat softened cream cheese, milk, lemon juice and sugar until smooth. Fold in one cup of the whipped topping. Spoon 1 tablespoon of the graham crackers into each of four 8 to 10 ounce glasses, preferably the stemmed or sundae kind. Spoon into each about a quarter cup of the blueberry mixture, add about a quarter cup of the cheese mixture, then the rest of the crumbs, followed by about a quarter of the strawberry, cream cheese, etc. until everything is gone. If you don"t have enough cheese mixture to keep the layers separate, use some plain whipped topping. Cover and refrigerate for about six hours. At serving time, top each glass with a dollop of whipped topping. Stand a bright red strawberry in the center, and scatter a few of the reserved blueberries around. Happy birthday America!



Thought for the week: God Bless America. Especially as the Fourth of July approaches, please, God, Bless America. We do not deserve it. Americans in general have been acting like the Prodigal Son. We have abandoned You. During the COVID shut downs we allowed government dictators to "mandate" that we not gather to worship You as You have asked us to do. America became great because of You. It can again be a beacon to the world if we as a nation follow Your teachings and value Your love. Instead, we have allowed You to be banished from our lives, our government buildings, our courthouses and our schools. Please do not punish us as we deserve. Instead, we pray, help us as a nation to once again give You the love and respect that You deserve and set our feet on the paths You have told us to follow. Amen.

P.S. As a special favor, please offer a prayer for recovery of someone very near and dear to me who has received a horrible medical diagnosis, and selfishly, also for our wonderful ancient oak to survive the gypsy moth onslaught.

(This column is written by Shirley Prudhomme of Crivitz. Views expressed are her own and are in no way intended to be an official statement of the opinions of Peshtigo Times editors and publishers. She may be contacted by phone at 715-291-9002 or by e-mail to shirleyprudhommechickadee@yahoo.com.)


Recent stories, opinions and photos

Issue Date Department Headline
08-10-2022Obituaries
Roger J. Balthazor

08-10-2022Obituaries
Marion  E. Carvenough

08-10-2022Obituaries
James D. Chevalier

08-10-2022Obituaries
William Frederiksen

08-10-2022Obituaries
Jerry Koester

08-10-2022Obituaries
Art LeSage

08-10-2022Obituaries
Katie N. Luna

08-10-2022Obituaries
Robert Murphy

08-10-2022Obituaries
Fred E. Ott

08-10-2022Obituaries
Mark A. Paris

08-10-2022Obituaries
Ronald Paulsen

08-10-2022Obituaries
Duane W. Schwendner

08-10-2022Obituaries
Gerald Severin

08-10-2022Obituaries
Alice L. Shaver

08-10-2022Obituaries
Keith E. Van Eyck

08-10-2022Obituaries
Cheri L. Vermeulen

08-10-2022Obituaries
Gerald "Jerry" Wojcik

08-10-2022Obituaries
Anthony G. Wontor

08-10-2022Front Page
Charges Filed In Fatal Crash Aug. 3 On Oconto Falls Hwy. I

08-10-2022Front Page
Shortage Of Jailers Remains Major Problem For County

08-10-2022Front Page
Peshtigo School Board Discuss Building Options

08-10-2022Front Page
Marinette County Voters Elected Miller Sheriff, Brazeau Court Clerk

08-10-2022Front Page
Emergency Rescue Squad, Inc. To Celebrate 75 Years of Service

08-10-2022Perspectives
Ken Stodola's Letter to the Editor

08-10-2022Perspectives
Judy Alwin's Letter to the Editor

08-10-2022Perspectives
Linda Gould's Letter to the Editor

08-10-2022Perspectives
Give Them a Break - From My window for 8/10/22

08-10-2022Perspectives
Country Cousin 8/10/22

08-10-2022Community - Wausaukee
Payant Family Held 75th Reunion July 31

08-10-2022Community - Wausaukee
Lakes Country Library Expansion Gets $25,000 Grant from WPS Foundation

08-10-2022Community - Wausaukee
Port of Valhalla Grand Opening Scheduled for Sat., August 27th

08-10-2022Sports
WIAA's KAGE RETIRES, BRITZ HIRED AS ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

08-10-2022Sports
Cougars Look to Reload to Defend Title

08-10-2022Community - Crivitz
Operation Bandshell Fundraiser Aug. 13th

08-10-2022Community - Crivitz
Crivitz Legion Post #413 Sells Flags

08-10-2022Community - Crivitz
Town Of Stephenson Board to Meet Aug. 10

08-10-2022Community - Crivitz
Fire Department Equipment Plan On Agenda For Crivitz Committee

08-10-2022Community - Coleman
Pound Town Board To Consider Hired Clerk, Treasurer Positions

08-10-2022Community - Coleman
Neil Diamond and Elvis Tribute at Equity

08-10-2022Community - Coleman
Coleman Has Music in the Park Aug. 11

08-10-2022Community - Coleman
Coleman Class of 1971 Reunion August 20th

08-08-2022Community - Wausaukee
Magdalen Deschane on UM Twin Cities Dean's List

08-08-2022Community - Wausaukee
First Annual Classic Car Show Saturday, Aug. 6th

08-08-2022Community - Wausaukee
Goodman Historical Craft, Bake Sale Sept. 17

08-08-2022Community - Wausaukee
Christian Music Duo, Blake & Jenna Bolerjack at Athelstane

08-08-2022Community - Crivitz
Town Of Stephenson Board To Meet Aug. 10

08-08-2022Community - Crivitz
Loomis Legion Auxiliary Brat Fray Sunday, Aug. 14

08-08-2022Community - Crivitz
Crivitz Ski Cats 60th Anniversary Alumni Show on Saturday Aug. 6

08-08-2022Community - Crivitz
Crivitz Board Okays Plan To Add K-9 Police Officer

08-08-2022Community - Crivitz
Crivitz Am. Legion Post to Celebrate US Coast Guard

08-08-2022Community - Crivitz
American Legion Annual Open House Aug. 17th

08-08-2022Perspectives
"Gathering Wild Roses" by Roger Lanich

08-08-2022Perspectives
Judy Reid's Letter to the Editor

08-08-2022Perspectives
Pete Pfankuch's Letter to the Editor

08-08-2022Perspectives
Derrick J. McGee's Letter to the Editor

08-08-2022Perspectives
David Johnson's Letter to the Editor

08-08-2022Perspectives
Engaged in Battles - From My Window 8/3/22

08-08-2022Perspectives
Country Cousin 8/3/22

08-08-2022Obituaries
Douglas R. Aagaard

08-08-2022Obituaries
Bernadine F. Brown

08-08-2022Obituaries
Steven J. Delfosse

08-08-2022Obituaries
Albert W. Ewaldt

08-08-2022Obituaries
Virginia Ferdon-Shallow

08-08-2022Obituaries
George Hoffman

08-08-2022Obituaries
Louise Kawa

08-08-2022Obituaries
Mary J. Kleinke

08-08-2022Obituaries
Jean La May

08-08-2022Obituaries
Darrell R. Laylin

08-08-2022Obituaries
Scott P. Piantek

08-08-2022Obituaries
Ronald J. Renk

08-08-2022Obituaries
Karrie A. Sadowski

08-08-2022Obituaries
Gary L. Seidl

08-08-2022Obituaries
Eunice M. Schultz

08-08-2022Obituaries
Ronald M. Shearer, Sr.

08-08-2022Obituaries
Sandra L. Mayou

08-08-2022Obituaries
Martin G. Wellner

08-08-2022Community - Coleman
Pantry Continues Food Distribution Procedures

08-08-2022Community - Coleman
Location Changed for Coleman FFA Alumni Annual Auction Aug. 6

08-08-2022Front Page
Wes Olson Now Sexton For Riverside Cemetery

08-08-2022Front Page
City Streets & Drainage Committee Okays Permits

08-08-2022Front Page
Aug. 9 Primary Contests For Federal, State, County Offices

08-08-2022Front Page
Chase Kuffel Hired As Peshtigo City Engineer

07-28-2022Front Page
Trygve Rhude Sworn In As Marinette County Supervisor

07-27-2022Community - Wausaukee
Wausaukee Students Win Poppy Poster Contest

07-27-2022Community - Wausaukee
Wausaukee Back to School Program Now Registering

07-27-2022Community - Wausaukee
Niagara Town Board May Stop Renting Town Hall

07-27-2022Perspectives
Wanna Go Hunting? DNR to Host Intro To Hunting Webinar Beginning July 28th

07-27-2022Perspectives
Gary B. Schahczenski's Letter to the Editor

07-27-2022Perspectives
Michael Sievert's Letter to the Editor

07-27-2022Perspectives
Gerry Schoenfeldt's Letter to the Editor

07-27-2022Perspectives
Cathi Malke's Letter to the Editor

07-27-2022Perspectives
Les Gertz's Letter to the Editor

07-27-2022Perspectives
Jessica Olson's Letter to the Editor

07-27-2022Perspectives
Ellen Hanneman's Letter to the Editor

07-27-2022Perspectives
Amy Grandaw's Letter to the Editor

07-27-2022Perspectives
Linda Gould's Letter to the Editor

07-27-2022Perspectives
Bob Blackbourn's Letter to the Editor

07-27-2022Perspectives
Bonnie C. Beamer's Letter to the Editor

07-27-2022Perspectives
Jeff Jandrey's Letter to the Editor

07-27-2022Perspectives
Family Matters - From My Window 7/27/22

07-27-2022Perspectives
Country Cousin 7/27/22

07-27-2022Obituaries
Arnold R. Belair

07-27-2022Obituaries
Donald A. Bertrand

07-27-2022Obituaries
James K. Beyer

07-27-2022Obituaries
Carol J. Borths

07-27-2022Obituaries
Michael J. Enstrom

07-27-2022Obituaries
Ruth E. Karkkainen

07-27-2022Obituaries
Judith A. Kirt

07-27-2022Obituaries
Margie A. Jones

07-27-2022Obituaries
Jacob J. Kaster

07-27-2022Obituaries
Michael J. Mann, Jr.

07-27-2022Obituaries
Marie Marquardt

07-27-2022Obituaries
Jeffery L. Meyer

07-27-2022Obituaries
Marcia A. Peters

07-27-2022Obituaries
Jean Ann Schmidt

07-27-2022Obituaries
Barbara A. Stoltenow

07-27-2022Obituaries
George D. Witkoswki

07-27-2022Community - Crivitz
Wisconsin Woodland Owners Assoc. Annual Picnic Aug. 13

07-27-2022Community - Crivitz
Twin Bridge Ski Team Learn To Ski Day July 31

07-27-2022Community - Crivitz
Middle Inlet Okays $5,000 For Fire Station Plan Specs

07-27-2022Community - Crivitz
Crivitz VFW Gun Show Aug. 13th

07-27-2022Community - Crivitz
Crivitz Library Bakeless Bake Sale Aug. 11th

07-27-2022Community - Coleman
Location Changed for Coleman FFA Alumni Annual Auction Aug. 6

07-27-2022Community - Coleman
Coleman Fire Department Announces Bike Winners

07-27-2022Community - Coleman
August "Remember When" Storytelling Aug. 3 at Lena

07-27-2022Front Page
MCIDC Discuss Loan Payments

07-27-2022Front Page
Crivitz Ski Cats State Water Ski Champions

07-27-2022Front Page
Athelstane Prohibits Nearly All Parking On Town Roads

07-20-2022Community - Wausaukee
2022 Hot Rod and Classic Car, Motorcycle Show July 30

07-20-2022Community - Wausaukee
Dunbar Board Tables Town Fee Schedule Until August

07-20-2022Community - Wausaukee
Register for Wausaukee Back to School Program

07-20-2022Perspectives
Stuart Millan's Letter to the Editor

07-20-2022Perspectives
Marshall Lund's Letter to the Editor

07-20-2022Perspectives
Kristen Edgar's Letter to the Editor

07-20-2022Perspectives
Bill Blair's Letter to the Editor

07-20-2022Perspectives
Who is Smarter? - From My Window 7/20/22

07-20-2022Perspectives
Country Cousin 7/20/22

07-20-2022Obituaries
Dorothy M. Benser

07-20-2022Obituaries
Stephen K. Boehmke

07-20-2022Obituaries
Dr. James A. Boren

07-20-2022Obituaries
Scott C. Krueger

07-20-2022Obituaries
Kris A. Miller

07-20-2022Obituaries
Michael J. Mann Jr.

07-20-2022Obituaries
Michael Oczus

07-20-2022Obituaries
Dennis A. Schiefelbein

07-20-2022Obituaries
Douglas E. Stacie

07-20-2022Obituaries
Samuel J. Schwittay

07-20-2022Obituaries
John E. Swanson

07-20-2022Obituaries
Kenneth James Vieth

07-20-2022Community - Crivitz
Town of Stephenson Airs Dog Complaints


space
Peshtigo Times
WEB Poll!
space Yes
No
Undecided
space
TO VOTE CLICK
YES, NO or UNDECIDED

Suggest a Question
space .
space
FRONT
space
.
space
CLASSIFIEDS
space
.
space
COMMUNITY
space
.
space
GUEST BOOK
space
.
space
NEWS
space
.
space
OBITS
space
.
space
PERSPECTIVES
space
.
space
SPORTS
space
.
space
SUBSCRIBE
space
.
space
.
space
PESHTIGO FIRE
space
.
space
CUSTOM PRINTING
space
.
space
TIMES' SAVER
space
.
space
Click for Peshtigo, Wisconsin Forecast
FORECAST
space
Quick...
News or Ad Search
Enter News key words.
Enter Ad key words.



Peshtigo Times
841 Maple St
PO Box 187
Peshtigo, WI 54157
Phone: 715-582-4541
Email:
News@
PeshtigoTimes.com

space
Fax: 715-582-4662
© 2000-2022
All right reserved
space
Powered by
WEB Media
Interactive
COMMUNITY
WEB sites